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Through the Lens with Chase | Week 5

Week 5 – Shooting macro on the South and West sides of Grand Cayman.

January 28th – February 4th

Through the Lens – keep up with the latest encounters we are experiencing out on the boats. As a lot of you know I rarely dive without a camera, so keep up with this blog in order to see what I have been seeing through the lens of my camera.

For most of week 5 I was a private instructor and photography coach for a client who really wanted to focus on macro photography. Our first dives were on the North Side, but that wouldn’t last for the rest of the week. Lucky for us, a Norwester had forced us to move our departure location to Red Bay where we have access to the South Side dive sites here in Grand Cayman. The topography of the south is much different than what our divers are used to, and we have learned to expect some awesome macro encounters while diving in this area.

Later in the week we moved back up to West Bay and continued our macro search. It was a nice change to be out on the boat all day and have the ability to splash in for all four of the dives. With almost 3 1/2 hours logged in the water on Sunday I went home feeling grateful for having so much time doing what I love. Check out what the dives brought in front of my camera and keep in mind what sites we were on, you never know if you might want to request a specific site or encounter on your next trip.

January 28th – Afternoon Dive #1 – Eagle Ray Pass

A school of Parrot fish that I believe to be spawning. If you notice the group in the upper left. Small groups would break off from the main school and swim upward releasing a white cloud that I believe to be the eggs from the female.

A school of Parrot fish that I believe to be spawning. If you notice the group in the upper left. Small groups would break off from the main school and swim upward releasing a white cloud that I believe to be the eggs from the female.

Afternoon Dive #2 – Romaine Reef

Fingerprint Cyphoma's do not show up on dives very often. This particular dive I was setup for wide angle, but couldn't help but go for the close focus shot.

Fingerprint Cyphoma’s do not show up on dives very often. This particular dive I was setup for wide angle, but couldn’t help but go for the close focus shot.

 

January 29th – Morning Dive #1 – Japanese Gardens

It appears that my approach may have scared this little guy.

It appears that my approach may have scared this little guy.

Blenny's are one of the most common macro subjects we can find here in Cayman. I like to focus on finding the Blenny's that have chosen a texture filled home surrounded by healthy coral or sponge to create a more intisive image.

Blennies are one of the most common macro subjects we can find here in Cayman. I like to focus on finding the Blennies that have chosen a texture filled home surrounded by healthy coral or sponge to create a more appealing image.

A very healthy patch of star coral with some awesome green polyps.

A very healthy patch of star coral with some awesome green polyps.

Morning Dive #2 – Red Bay Caves

A species of Blenny that doesn't spend its entire life in or near a hole in the rock/coral. The Triple Fin is always a favorite subject of mine.

A species of Blenny that doesn’t spend its entire life in or near a hole in the rock/coral. The Triple Fin is always a favorite subject of mine.

A shot of coral polyps with the use of a +10 Diopter.

A shot of coral polyps with the use of a +10 Diopter.

A very fast moving subject but there colors always make it worth the work.

A very fast moving subject but there colors always make it worth the work.

While diving south during the Norwester we were fortunate enough to find the rare Ornate Elysia crawling around in some algae.

While diving south during the Norwester we were fortunate enough to find the rare Ornate Elysia crawling around in some algae.

A pair of Redlip Blennies hanging out together. I assume this must have been some mating behaviour as the two Blennies would keep coming back for little swimming dances.

A pair of Redlip Blennies hanging out together. I assume this must have been some mating behavior as the two Blennies would keep coming back for little swimming dances.

Redlip Blennies are a very common site on the South Side. It's always nice to see some different critters while we are down there.

Redlip Blennies are a very common site on the South Side. It’s always nice to see some different critters while we are down there.

January 31st – Morning Dive #1 – Orange Canyon

A Banded Coral Shrimp carrying eggs.

A Banded Coral Shrimp carrying eggs.

A Secretary Blenny with a very stylish home.

A Secretary Blenny with a very stylish home.

This Triple Fin Blenny was extremely coporative. I used the +10 diopter to achieve this image, so I was extremely close to it when I pulled the trigger.

This Triple Fin Blenny was extremely cooperative. I used the +10 diopter to achieve this image, so I was extremely close to it when I pulled the trigger.

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To take this shot, my diopter sits on the end of my lens making it even longer. To achieve focus on this blenny that is only cm’s in length I was about an inch from his face. So I thank you Mr. Blenny for making this image happen.

Morning Dive #2 – Hepps Pipeline

A White Spotted Morray showing off his teeth at Hepps Pipeline. We saw a total of five eels on this dive.

A White Spotted Morray showing off his teeth at Hepps Pipeline. We saw a total of five eels on this dive.

Afternoon Dive #1 – Trinity Caves

A Secretary Blenny caught out in the open away from his hole. A rare find to see this guys without the protection of there home.

A Secretary Blenny caught out in the open away from his hole. A rare find to see this guys without the protection of there home.

Twice in one dive I found these little guys out in the open.

Twice in one dive I found these little guys out in the open.

One of the two color variations we see of the Roughhead Blenny. I do not see this Yellow color scheme very often, so it was a treat for the end of the dive.

One of the two color variations we see of the Roughhead Blenny. I do not see this Yellow color scheme very often, so it was a treat for the end of the dive.

Afternoon Dive #2 – Wreck of the Doc Paulson

A colony of Feather Duster Worms on the Doc Paulson.

A colony of Feather Duster Worms on the Doc Paulson.

A bit of a texture shot. This worm caught my eye and I couldn't help but see its close appearance to a heart.

A bit of a texture shot. This worm caught my eye and I couldn’t help but see its close appearance to a heart.

A pair of Slender File Fish caught together.

A pair of Slender File Fish caught together.

A Sharpnose Puffer poses for a close up.

A Sharpnose Puffer poses for a close up.

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Couldn’t help but set up for a shot of this colorful little guy. 

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Thank you everyone for checking out my work for the week. We look forward to continuing our pursuit of underwater photography/videography and sharing it with all of you along the way.

Get in touch with me. I would love to help with photography questions, or even just talk about one of the images from this Week.

If you are interested in purchasing prints of our work send me an email for cost and sizing options.

chase@dnsdiving.com

Until next time.

“I have a passion for the ocean and not only experiencing it and its inhabitants, but also documenting them, so keep your eyes open for new blog posts to keep up with my latest encounters”

              Chase

 

 

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